The Lady and the Pig

Born in Cincinnati in 1879 to a wealthy Jewish family, Edith Louise Rosenbaum took an interest in fashion at an early age. After attending a series of finishing schools, she moved to Paris to become a saleswoman for a haute couture fashion house. Soon afterward, she wrote for a fashion journal connected with Philadelphia-based Wanamaker’s Department Store and designed fashions for Butterick Patterns. Then in 1910, a new trade publication for the garment industry, Women’s Wear Daily in New York, hired Edith to be their Paris correspondent. She covered all the style shows and wrote a front-page column about current trends and her impressions of everyone and everything connected with the fashion world.

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Edith Rosenbaum in 1911

The following year, Edith became engaged to Ludwig Loewe from Berlin. While riding with him and their friends across France to cover the fashions at the Deauville races, their car crashed into a tree, killing Ludwig and throwing Edith to the back of the vehicle. She suffered a concussion and had no memory of the crash afterward. Her mother later gave her a small stuffed toy pig, perhaps hearing that pigs were a symbol of good luck in France. The pig was covered in black and white fur, and played a popular tune called La Maxixe when its tail was wound. Edith would later give partial credit to the pig for her escape from Titanic.

By 1912, Edith became a buyer in Paris for a number of American firms in addition to her work at Women’s Wear Daily. Anxious to return to New York with purchases for her clients, she booked passage on April 5 on the ship George Washington, which would sail on Easter Sunday, two days later. But her editor called and asked her to delay her return in order to cover a race on Sunday. So Edith changed her ticket to the Titanic, sailing April 10th from Cherbourg.

Edith brought 19 pieces of baggage aboard the ship, and possibly booked a second cabin for them, in addition to her own first class cabin. When the ship struck the iceberg on the night of April 14, Edith locked all her trunks, made her way to the deck, and watched the proceedings from the lounge. When she saw her steward, Robert Wareham, she asked him to retrieve her pig from her stateroom, which he did. When White Star Line’s Bruce Ismay noticed her in the lounge, he insisted she get into a lifeboat. A crewmember threw the pig into Boat 11, and Edith climbed in. Although the pig’s nose and two legs were broken, it helped entertain the children aboard the lifeboat as the survivors awaited rescue.

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Edith holding her lucky pig

On April 19, Edith reported in Women’s Wear Daily on the garments worn by Titanic’s most elite passengers, even as they made their escape from the ship. She then sued White Star Line for nearly $15,000 plus $2,000 left in the purser’s safe, but only received 3 cents on the dollar. It took her several years to pay back her clients and recover her losses.

“I’m accident prone. . . I’ve had every disaster but bubonic plague and a husband.”

She continued work as a fashion buyer until 1937, changed her last name to Russell, traveled extensively, and became a well-known celebrity and authority on the Titanic disaster.  She often posed with her stuffed pig, which could no longer be played. She lived in London until her death at age 95.

E Russell later years with pig

Walter Lord, author of A Night to Remember, a book about the tragedy, inherited Edith’s famous pig. He later bequeathed it to the National Maritime Museum in London. After the 2012 centennial commemoration of the sinking, the museum restored the pig’s music mechanism. Today, La Maxixe can be heard once again.

 

Photo credits: Encyclopedia Titanica, Wikipedia

8 Comments on “The Lady and the Pig

  1. Hi Peggy

    Are you going to post this on Facebook? I always like to share with my friends. Thanks.

    Dave Brangan

    • Hi Dave,
      Wordpress was giving me a lot of trouble this time! But I did post it on my regular FB and it automatically is shared on my Writer Peggy Wirgau FB page. Not sure where you normally see it, but if you “Like” WPW it will show up in your newsfeed. Otherwise, just copy the link from the blog post at peggywirgau.com and paste it on your Facebook post. Thank you very much for sharing it!

  2. Hi Peggy,

    It is interesting what small things can make such a difference in our lives. A small object, like a toy pig, can carry such sentimental value that it is a source of comfort and courage for Edith and her fellow life boat passengers. Thank you for sharing her story.

    • Thanks, Mary. I’m so glad you like this post. If she had managed to save those valuable clothes she brought on the voyage instead of her pig, they wouldn’t be nearly as interesting to us now, or to the children in the lifeboat then!

    • Norman, thank you so much for sending this wonderful article. It’s incredible to read about the launching of those ships. I would absolutely love to visit Belfast one day. I know they’re having a big Titanic event next April.
      I see Mr. Keith also built the Rotterdam, which was the ship my grandmother took to America at age 22. So I feel I have a bit of a Belfast connection 🙂 Thank you again!

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